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Posts Tagged ‘Tools’

Driver Tools – DriverView

April 11th, 2008 No comments

DriverView utility displays the list of all device drivers currently loaded on your system. For each driver in the list, additional useful information is displayed: load address of the driver, description, version, product name, company that created the driver, and more.

driverview

System Requirement

This utility works under Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Vista. Windows 98 and Windows ME are not supported. If you want to run this utility on Windows NT, you should download the ‘psapi.dll’ and place it in your system32 directory.

Versions History

  • Version 1.17:
    • Added ‘Google Search’ option, which opens a Google search of the current selected driver filename in your default Web browser.
  • Version 1.16:
    • Added new option: Hide Microsoft drivers.
  • Version 1.15:
    • Added new option: Mark Non-Microsoft Drivers.
  • Version 1.14:
    • Fixed bug: The main window lost the focus when the user switched to another application and then returned back to DriverView.
  • Version 1.13:
    • Added support for saving as comma-delimited text file.
  • Version 1.12:
    • Added support for x64, as a separated download.
  • Version 1.11:
    • The configuration is now saved to a file, instead of the Registry.
  • Version 1.10:
    • Find dialog-box
    • New column: Created Date.
    • Added support for translating to other languages.
    • Added support for XP style.
    • Save to XML.
    • “Copy Selected Items” now copy the items as tab-delimited text.
  • Version 1.00 – First release.

Using The DriverView Utility

This utility is a standalone executable, so it doesn’t require any installation process or additional DLLs. Just run the executable (driverview.exe) and start using it. There is only one exception: If you want to run this utility on Windows NT, you should download the ‘psapi.dll’, and copy it into the system32 folder.

The main window of DriverView utility displays the list of all loaded drivers on your system. You can select one or more drivers from the list, and then copy the details of these drivers to the clipboard, save them to text or HTML file, or watch them as HTML report in your browser.
In addition, you can change the order of the columns in the drivers table by dragging them to the desired position, or by using the ‘Choose Columns’ dialog-box.

Command-Line Options

Option Description
/stext <Filename> Saves the list of all drivers into a regular text file.
/stab <Filename> Saves the list of all drivers into a tab-delimited text file.
/scomma <Filename> Saves the list of all drivers into a comma-delimited text file.
/stabular <Filename> Saves the list of all drivers into a tabular text file.
/shtml <Filename> Saves the list of all drivers into horizontal HTML file.
/sverhtml <Filename> Saves the list of all drivers into vertical HTML file.
/sxml <Filename> Saves the list of all drivers into XML file.
Categories: Driver Tools Tags:

Tools to Troubleshoot Vista system drivers

March 26th, 2008 No comments

You have probably experienced problems with your drivers if you are running Microsoft Windows Vista. Most of these problems have to do with the drivers on your device being incompatible with Vista. Although it seems that many companies are coming out with driver updates to solve this problem, you might still have problems with this. Here’s how to troubleshoot your driver problems:

If you are looking for detailed device information on a specific driver, you can go to your Device Manager, select the device from the list, and then view the device’s property sheet. This works great if you know which specific driver you are having issues with. However, if you are not sure which driver is causing the problems, this way is very time consuming. Instead,  you can use a command-line tool called Driver Query.

Using Driver Query

Driver Query (Driverquery.exe) is a command-line tool  that is designed to provide you with a detailed list of all the device drivers installed on a local system or on any system on a network. To do its job the Driver Query provides you with a series of command-line parameters. (You can use the Driver Query command without any parameters, but using them allows you to get more specific details as well as format the results.)

For example, using the /si parameter provides information on just the signed drivers. Using the /v parameter (verbose mode) provides more details. Using the /fo parameter allows you to format the results as a list or to save the results in a CSV file (Comma Separated Values) so you can open them in a spreadsheet application such as Excel. (If you want to do any type of detailed analysis, you should save the results as a CSV file.)

To create a spreadsheet file containing information about only the signed drivers, you would open a Command Prompt window and type the command:

Driverquery /fo csv /si > signeddrivers.csv

To create a spreadsheet file containing detailed information about all the installed drivers, you would use this command:

Driverquery /fo csv /v > alldrivers.csv

Driver Problem? Try XP Utility – Driver Verifier

June 28th, 2007 No comments

Driver Verifier is a hidden tool for monitoring Windows kernel-mode drivers and graphics drivers. Microsoft strongly encourages hardware manufacturers to test their drivers with Driver Verifier to ensure that drivers are not making illegal function calls or causing system corruption.

To use Driver Verifier, go to Start / Run and type VERIFIER in the text box.

In the Driver Verifier Manager, choose the Standard Settings

Choose Select Drivers from a list

Check the boxes next to the drivers you wish to select

You'll be prompted to reboot your machine. Once you reboot, either you'll see the dreaded blue screen, which will contain an error message. If your system reboots normally, the drivers selected aren't a problem.

*Important note: Your Driver Verifier Manager stays active until you disable it. To disable, go to Start / Run and type VERIFIER /RESET

For more information about the Driver Verifier, read “Using Driver Verifier to identify issues with Windows drivers for advanced users.”

Categories: Troubleshooting, Uncategorized Tags: ,

Driverquery command on Windows XP

October 22nd, 2006 No comments

When you are trying to troubleshoot a suspected device driver problem, it can be confusing (and time consuming) to locate detailed information about your device properties. (You can go to “Device Manager”, then select your device from the list and locate the properties for that specific device. If you are just looking for information on one driver, this is not a big deal, but if you need to find detailed information on several devices, this would be take too long.)

There is a tool called Driver Query. (Driverquery.exe) Driver Query will provide you with a detailed list of all the device drivers installed on a local system. (Or on any system on a network) Here’s how to use it:

  1. Open a Command Prompt window.
  2. Type Driverquery on the command line.

You will see the results displayed in a table format in the Command Prompt window. If you want to perform more detailed analysis, you can direct the Driver Query to save the results in a CSV file so you can open them in a spreadsheet application. To do so, type the following on the command line:

Driverquery /v  /fo  csv  > drivers.csv

Note: This tip applies only to Windows XP Professional.

Categories: XP Drivers Tags: , ,