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Posts Tagged ‘Device Manager’

CD drive or DVD drive is missing in Windows XP

February 23rd, 2010 2 comments

Q. Help, my CD drive or DVD drive is missing?

A. I am taking this to mean your CD/DVD drive is not recognized, so you can’t play a CD or DVD.

You probably have either corrupted or deleted Windows registry entries. To solve this problem, you need to use the Registry Editor. ***Note: By using Registry Editor, you are modifying the registry. Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Make sure that you follow these steps carefully. For added protection, back up the registry before you modify it. For more information about how to back up and restore the registry, click here to read the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

  1. Click Start, and then click Run.
  2. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.
  3. In the navigation pane, locate and then click the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4D36E965-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}
  4. In the right pane, click UpperFilters.
    *** Note – You may also see an UpperFilters.bak registry entry. You do not have to remove that entry. Click UpperFilters only. If you do not see the UpperFilters registry entry, you still might have to remove the LowerFilters registry entry. To do this, go to step 7.
  5. On the Edit menu, click Delete.
  6. When you are prompted to confirm the deletion, click Yes.
  7. In the right pane, click LowerFilters.
    *** Note – If you do not see the LowerFilters registry entry, unfortunately this content cannot help you any further. Try contacting Microsoft for additional support.
  8. On the Edit menu, click Delete.
  9. When you are prompted to confirm the deletion, click Yes.
  10. Exit Registry Editor.
  11. Restart the computer.
  12. Click Start, click My Computer, and then see whether the drive is listed.

If you still can’t play or access a CD or DVD at this point, next try to reinstall the programs. If that doesn’t work, check to see if there are updates available at the manufacturer’s website. Some examples of programs that might be affected are:

  • iTunes software by Apple
  • Nero software by Nero Inc
  • Roxio Creator software by Sonic Solutions
  • Zune software by Microsoft

Additionally, you  can try to remove and reinstall the device drivers.

Do the following to remove and reinstall the device drivers:

  1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
  2. Click System and Maintenance, and then click System,
  3. On the Hardware tab, click Device Manager. If you are prompted for an administrator password or for a confirmation, type the password, or click Allow.
  4. In Device Manager, expand DVD/CD-ROM drives, right-click the CD and DVD devices, and then click Uninstall.
  5. When you are prompted to confirm that you want to remove the device, click OK.
  6. Restart the computer.

After the computer restarts, the drivers should be automatically installed.

Code 39 Error Message

January 21st, 2010 1 comment

Windows cannot load the device driver for this hardware. The driver may be corrupted or missing. (Code 39)

This is a Device Manager error code. A Code 39 error is usually caused by a missing driver, or by a Windows Registry issue.  A Code 39 error can apply to any hardware device in Device Manager. A Code 39 error usually appears on optical drives like CD and DVD drives. Any of Microsoft’s operating systems can experience a Code 39 Device Manager error.

Possible Solutions:

  1. First try to restart your computer. There is always a possibility that a Code 39 error might be caused by some fluke with Device Manager or your BIOS.
  2. If you recently installed a device or made changes in Device Manager prior to seeing the Code 39 error, undo whatever changes you made to see if the Code 39 error goes away. (Depending on what changes you made, this could mean removing the newly installed device, rolling back the driver to a previous version or using the System Restore to undo Device Manager changes. Remember to restart your computer after undoing changes.)
  3. Delete the UpperFilters and LowerFilters registry values. A common cause of Code 39 errors is the corruption of two specific registry values in the DVD/CD-ROM Drive Class registry key. You can also try deleting similar values in the Windows Registry if the Code 39 error appears on hardware other than a DVD or CD drive.
  4. Reinstall the device drivers. Remove the currently installed driver and then let Windows install it over again.
  5. Update the device drivers. If there is an update for your device drivers, it might fix a Code 39 error.
  6. Replace your device. It is possible that either your device isn’t compatible with the version of Windows, or there might be a malfunction with the hardware of your device.

How To Access Device Manager in Windows Vista

January 11th, 2010 No comments

The Device Manager is a part of Microsoft Windows Vista. It gives you an organized view of all recognized devices installed on your computer. The Device Manager is used to change options, manage your drivers, enabling and disabling your devices, such as your hard disk drives, USB devices, keyboards, sound cards and more.

To access the Device Manager in Windows Vista:

  1. Click the Start Menu
  2. Type “Device Manager” and hit return
    screen_start_type_device_manager

OR

  1. Click the Start Menu,
  2. Click the Control Panel,
    btn_control_panel
  3. Click the Device Manager Icon
    icon_device_manager

How to Enable a Device in Windows 7

December 6th, 2009 4 comments

Even though you might see your device displayed in the Device Manager in Windows 7, you must enable it before you can use it. When your device is disabled, Windows won’t assign system resources to it. The devices that are disabled will have a black arrow next to them and will generate a Code 22 error.

Here’s how to enable a device once you are in the Device Manager:

  • Right click on the hardware device you want to enable
  • Select Properties
  • Click on the Driver tab
  • Click Enable, then click OK
  • Once you return to the Device Manager, the black arrow should be gone. If you see a yellow exclamation point, the device still isn’t working properly. Click here to see how to troubleshoot the yellow exclamation point.
  • If you want to verify that your device is working properly, you can check the device status in the Device Manager.

How to Enable a Device in Windows XP

December 4th, 2009 No comments

Even though you might see your device displayed in the Device Manager in Windows XP, you must enable it before you can use it. When your device is disabled, Windows won’t assign system resources to it. The devices that are disabled will have a red x next to them and will generate a Code 22 error.

Here’s how to enable a device once you are in the Device Manager:

  • Right click on the hardware device you want to enable
  • Select Properties
  • Click on the Device Usage drop down box – right now it should say “Do not use this device”
  • Select “Use this device” and click OK
  • Once you return to the Device Manager, the red x should be gone. If you see a yellow exclamation point, the device still isn’t working properly. Click here to see how to troubleshoot the yellow exclamation point.
  • If you want to verify that your device is working properly, you can check the device status in the Device Manager.
Categories: XP Drivers Tags: ,

Delete the UpperFilters and LowerFilters Registry Values

December 3rd, 2009 No comments

You can solve several Device Manager error codes by deleting the UpperFilters and LowerFilters registry values from the Windows Registry. Some of the common Device Manager error codes that are caused by UpperFilters and LowerFilters include Code 19, Code 31, Code 39 and Code 41.

It is fairly simple to remove the UpperFilters and LowerFilters registry values. Before you get started, make sure you have backed up the registry keys that you are modifying.

  • Click Start, Run.
  • In the textbox, type regedit (This opens the Registry Editor program.)
  • Click OK.
  • Find the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE folder and click the (+) icon to expand the folder.
  • Keep expanding the folders until you reach the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class registry key.
  • Click the (+) icon next to the CLASS list to expand it. You’ll see a list of 32 digit subkeys. Each one is unique and corresponds to a different class of hardware.
  • Now you need to figure out which device glass GUID (Globally Unique Identifier) you need.
  • Click on the correct subkey
  • Right click on UpperFilters and choose Delete. Confirm that you would like to delete it.
  • Now, right click on LowerFilters and choose Delete. Confirm that you would like to delete it.
  • If you see files named UpperFilters.bak or LowerFilters.bak, you don’t need to delete them.
  • Close the Registry Editor and restart your computer.

Yellow Exclamation Point

November 23rd, 2009 No comments

yellow exclamation pointA yellow exclamation point next to a device in Device Manager means that Windows has identified a problem of some kind of problem with that device.

This helps notify you that there might be a system resource conflict, a driver issue or another problem. Seeing the yellow mark itself doesn’t give you any valuable information other than notify you of a problem. It does mean that a “Device Manager Error Code” has been generated. To fix whatever problem is going on, you’ll need to view this code and troubleshoot accordingly.

Device Manager – Red X

November 22nd, 2009 No comments

device-manager-red-xA small red x next to a hardware device in the Device Manager means that the device is disabled. It could be that you disabled it, or Windows might have disabled it because of a problem with the device. To remove the red x, just enable the device again. If there are issues with your device, you’ll see a yellow exclamation point next to the device instead of the red x. Click here to read what the yellow exclamation point means.

*Disabled devices also generate Device Manager error codes. The error in this case is a Code 22.

Updating Windows XP Drivers

November 15th, 2009 1 comment

Why should you take the time to update your Windows XP Drivers? Here’s what you need to understand what you are updating and what it will change:

Windows XP uses drivers that corresponds with your computer and programs every time you use open your computer to do something. To make sure your computer and devices are performing to their max, you need to make sure you have the latest drivers installed on your computer. This includes hardware like mouse drivers, keyboard drivers, graphics card, system essentials, other hardware, internal hardware, motherboard and Windows drivers, etc. There are too many drivers to list , but if you are curious what drivers are installed on your computer currently, look at the ‘System and System 32’ files in your Windows root folder (usually on your C drive).

Anything with a shell or .dll extension is a driver that will Windows XP will be using to launch your applications.

One of the most common problems you will see for computers that don’t have the latest Windows XP drivers installed is the Device Manager error codes, which happens when a hardware fails to install properly.

XP is programmed to have a list of drivers for each manufacturer stored somewhere in the root drive. Driver files are normally small, as they consist normally of only instruction and constructed code. So, Microsoft is able to constantly update and add new device signatures into its data banks and suggest new updates for you to install to your computer. (This is known as the ‘automatic update’ service, where the main Microsoft server will download the files into your computer (which will more than often require a restart) and update it.

Error Message: “This device cannot start. (Code 10)”

November 9th, 2009 No comments

A Code 10 error occurs when Device Manager can’t start a hardware device. This error is usually caused by corrupted or outdated drivers, so most often the solution is pretty easy.

  • The first solution to try is to restart your machine. Some error messages can be caused by a temporary problem.
  • Next, did you just install a new device or update? If you did, this might have caused the problem. Either roll back the driver you installed, or use the System Restore to undo recent Device Manager changes.
  • The most common fix for a Code 10 error is to uninstall and reinstall your device drivers. If it is a USB device device is generating the Code 10 error, uninstall every device under the Universal Serial Bus controllers hardware category in Device Manager as part of the driver reinstall.
  • You might also try to update the drivers for your device, if a more current version is available.
  • You can run an update for the Windows Service Pack. There might be a patch available which will solve your error.
  • If all of the above solutions don’t fix it, you might need to replace your hardware.