Archive

Archive for January, 2011

SilverFast Ai Minolta Scanner Software Driver Update

January 25th, 2011 No comments

LaserSoft Imaging has long been setting the standard for digital imaging software with their primary application product SilverFast. This is actually a family of programs divided into the kind of device primarily supported and this includes various scanners, digital cameras, and printers. As an added measure of compatibility, the company designs their software in association with the different hardware manufacturers that focus on digital imaging. If you’re looking for an application for your Minolta scanner, then this particular version of SilverFast Ai might just be the program you need.

SilverFast Ai is the edition for advanced and professional users. The application can be used on its own, as a plug-in for Photoshop, or as general API (TWAIN) for bridging digital imaging devices and software. This update, version 6.6.2r4 released January 25, 2011, adds several robust features such as support for Photoshop CS5 and direct conversion of Ektar 100 film negatives to colored positives through its NegaFix function. It can now also allow your Minolta scanner to handle HDRi raw data images and accommodate a wider variety of digital camera profiles. The update is compatible with Windows 2000, XP, Vista, and Windows 7.

Click here to download the latest trial version of SilverFast Ai Minolta scanner software. Take note that with this trial copy all output will have a watermark of the brand.

 

Categories: Hardware, Scanners Tags:

SilverFast for Scanner Driver Update

January 25th, 2011 No comments

The SilverFast software (SE/Ai 6.6) offers several advanced features such as 64bit HDRi, Multi-Exposure, iSRD, IT8 Scanner Calibration and ICC Printer Calibration, Kodachrome Features, Auto-Frame, Auto-Sharpening, Gamma-Optimization, NegaFix, Movies for beginners and so on. This software is user friendly because particular software is designed specifically for beginner (SilverFast SE), advanced (SilverFast Ai ) and expert (SilverFast Pro Studio ) users.

SilverFast software ensures optimum functionality of several devices such as scanners, digital cameras or any imaging and printing devices. Its latest update (Version 6.6.2r4) was released last January 25, 2011 and supports Windows 7, Windows 2000, Windows Vista, Windows XP operating systems.

The overview of SilverFast software

  1. Silverfast SE/Ai – this scanner software allows any scanner to work perfectly with excellent outputs.
  2. SilverFast HDR – this imaging software processes 48Bit/64Bit HDRi images, processes raw data, and has more advanced features compared to other scanner software.
  3. SilverFast Archive Suite – this software (Ai+ HRD) is the combination of a scanner and imaging software. This is one of the best archiving tools.
  4. SilverFast DC – this digital camera software allows the users to store and optimize raw or unedited images.
  5. SilverFast PrinTao – this printer software is user friendly with real (e.g. color) and best printing outputs.

New Features

  1. Ektar 100 NegaFix profile new feature
  2. Supports PhotoShop CS5 & Elements 9
  3. HDRi format plus additional feature
  4. Better automatic iSRD mode
  5. Better Kodachrome feature
  6. Supports Win7 & Snow Leopard
  7. Hot-folder additional feature
  8. Camera profiles additional feature

Outdated scanner driver may cause several problems to your system. Therefore it is vital to update your scanner driver. You can click here to get the latest scanner driver update.

Categories: Printers, Scanners, XP Drivers Tags:

SilverFast Ai – Minolta Scanner Software (Win) Driver Update

January 25th, 2011 No comments

The SilverFast SE/Ai 6.6 scanner software features include 64bit HDRi, Multi-Exposure, iSRD, IT8 Scanner Calibration and ICC Printer Calibration, Kodachrome Features, Auto-Frame, Auto-Sharpening, Gamma-Optimization, NegaFix, Movies for beginners and more. It is offers separate software for beginners, advanced and expert users, the SilverFast SE, SilverFast Ai and SilverFast Pro Studio, respectively.

If you have scanners, digital cameras, or any print and images processing devices, expect them to function at their full potential with the use of the SilverFast software. Like for example, the LaserSoft Imaging software supports independent adjusted solutions for many flatbed and film scanners and digital cameras. As a result, the functionality of each device is optimized.

The overview of SilverFast software:

  • SilverFast SE / Ai (scanner software) – this software offers perfect scans which are excellent copies of the original.
  • SilverFast HDR (imaging software) – 48Bit/64Bit HDRi image processing, RAW data processing, a lot more advanced than the other imaging software like PhotoShop.
  • SilverFast Archive Suite (Ai + HDR) – this is the best storing or archiving tool using the combination of both a scanner and an imaging software.
  • SilverFast DC (digital camera software) – optimize and archive the images using a RAW workflow.
  • SilverFast PrinTao (printer software) – easy to use and gives the best and real color printing.

Award:

Best Color Management – awarded by EDP (European Digital Press Association) in 2008.

Date Released:

January 25, 2011

Version:

6.6.2r4

Supported Operating Systems:

Windows 7, Windows 2000, Windows Vista, Windows XP

Features of the update:

  • Additional Ektar 100 NegaFix profile feature
  • Supports PhotoShop CS5 & Elements 9
  • Additional feature of HDRi format plus
  • Enhanced automatic iSRD mode
  • Enhanced Kodachrome features
  • Supports Win7 & Snow Leopard
  • Additional New Hot-folder feature
  • Additional new camera profiles feature

To enjoy the full potential of your scanner, go to this link and download the latest update of your scanner driver.

 

Categories: Printers, Scanners, XP Drivers Tags:

SilverFast Ai (Hewlett Packard) Driver Update

January 25th, 2011 No comments

LaserSoft AG developed the SilverFast computer program with the following improved features: 64-bit HDRi, Multi-Exposure, iSRD, IT8 Scanner Calibration and ICC Printer Calibration, Kodachrome Features, Auto-Frame, Auto-Sharpening, Gamma-Optimization, NegaFix, Movies for beginners, etc. The company’s products also provide solutions that are specific and adjustable for a wide range of scanning and imaging devices such flatbed and film scanners and digital cameras. Consequently, each device is able to achieve its optimum performance.

SilverFast software overview:

  • The scanner software – SiverFast SE/Ai- works with many scanners available in the market today and it also optimizes their performance.
  • The printer software – SilverFast PrinTao – is created with a lot to offer in relation to functionality, making sure that each printer’s performance is optimized.
  • The digital camera software – SilverFast DC – enables the system to view, edit and store digital images in a less complicated way.
  • The imaging software – SilverFast HRD – makes it possible for any imaging device to process 48-bit and 64-bit raw data with high quality output.

New Features

  • Plus Ektar 100 NegaFix profile feature
  • Has PhotoShop CS5 & Elements 9 support
  • Plus HDRi format plus feature
  • Has improved automatic iSRD mode
  • Has improved Kodachrome feature
  • Has Win7 & Snow Leopard support
  • Plus Hot-folder feature
  • Plus Camera profiles feature

Version – 6.6.2r4

Date Release – January 25, 2011

Supported Operating Systems – Windows 7, Windows 2000, Windows Vista, Windows NT, Windows XP

Any scanning or imaging device won’t be able to perform at their optimum level without the right and an updated driver. Follow this link to install the newest version of your driver.

Categories: Printers, Scanners, XP Drivers Tags:

SilverFast Ai Epson 4870 (Win) Driver Update

January 25th, 2011 No comments

SilverFast allows every Epson’s device to perform at their highest level. As a result, Epson decided to design most of their scanners with compatibility mode with SilverFast. Advanced scanner features such as digitizing documents and photos and scanning (slides, negatives and film strips) are made possible by flatbed scanners, which are also supported by SilverFast.

Supported features

  • Supports Multi-Exposure (SilverFast Plus/SilverFast Ai Studio)
  • Supports iSRD Multi-sampling (SilverFast Plus/SilverFast Ai versions)
  • Supports HRDi
  • Supports ICE
  • Supports Auto IT8 (optional for SilverFast Ai)
  • Supports Kodachrome (SilverFast Plus/SilverFast Ai versions)
  • Supports printer calibration (optional for SilverFast Ai)

SilverFast software overview

  • The SiverFast SE/Ai software for scanner is designed to work best with a wide array of scanner devices. It also ensures every device to work at their best.
  • The SilverFast PrinTao software for printers is designed with extensive functions. As a result, every printer functions to its full potential.
  • The SilverFast DC software for digital cameras allows easy and handy viewing, editing and archiving of digital photos.
  • The SilverFast HRD software for imaging complies with the highest standards in processing 48-bit and 64-bit raw data.

New Features of the update

  • Additional feature for Ektar 100 NegaFix profile
  • Works with PhotoShop CS5 & Elements 9
  • Additional feature for HDRi format plus
  • Improved feature for Automatic iSRD mode
  • Improved feature for Kodachrome improved feature
  • Works with Win7 & Snow Leopard
  • Additional feature for Hot-folder
  • Additional feature for Camera profiles

Version – 6.6.2r4

Date Release – January 25, 2011

Supported Operating Systems – Windows 7, Windows 2000, Windows Vista, Windows NT, Windows XP

To make use of all the advanced features of your devices, always make sure that your driver is not outdated. You can download the latest driver update here.

 

 

 

Categories: Cameras, Scanners, XP Drivers Tags: ,

SilverFast Ai Epson 4990 (Win) Driver Update

January 25th, 2011 No comments

The SilverFast software SE/Ai 6.6 driver package includes the following improved features:

  • 64bit HDRi, Multi-Exposure
  • iSRD
  • IT8 Scanner Calibration and ICC Printer Calibration
  • Kodachrome Features
  • Auto-Frame
  • Auto-Sharpening
  • Gamma-Optimization
  • NegaFix
  • Movies for beginners
  • etc.

Anybody, regardless of expertise level can make use of this software because individual program was created for beginner, advanced and expert users. They are SilverFast SE, SilverFast Ai and SilverFast Pro Studio respectively. By downloading this driver, you will be ensured that your scanners, digital cameras, printers, or any imaging devices will work at their full potential.

SilverFast software overview:

  • SilverFast scanner software (Silverfast SE/Ai) ensures high scanning quality results.
  • SilverFast imaging software (SilverFast HDR) allows the processing of 48Bit/64Bit HDRi images and raw data. This software is also guaranteed to have more advanced features in comparison to other imaging software.
  • SilverFast Archive Suite software (Ai+HRD) is an exceptional archiving tool that combines both the scanner and imaging software.
  • SilverFast digital camera software (SilverFast DC) processes and stores RAW images.
  • SilverFast printer software is (SilverFast PrinTao) easy to use and ensures great color quality prints.

The latest SilverFast Ai Epson 4990 update (Version 6.6.2r4) for Windows are now available. This driver update was released last January 25, 2011. The supported operating systems are Windows 7, Windows 2000, Windows Vista, Windows NT, and Windows XP.

New Features of the update

  • Adds Ektar 100 NegaFix profile
  • Compatible with PhotoShop CS5 & Elements 9
  • Adds HDRi format plus
  • Automatic iSRD mode improved feature
  • Kodachrome improved feature
  • Compatible with Win7 & Snow Leopard
  • Adds Hot-folder
  • Adds Camera profiles

Drivers are updated to fix bugs of the previous releases. To take advantage of these features, make sure to install the latest driver update.

 

Categories: Printers, Scanners, XP Drivers Tags: ,

Windows XP Crash Recovery – When all else Fails

January 21st, 2011 1 comment

WARNING: Do not use the procedure described in this post, if your computer has an OEM-installed operating system (Dell, HP, Compaq, etc). The system hive on OEM installations creates user accounts and passwords that were not there previously. If you use the procedure described in this post, you may not be able to log back into the recovery console to restore the original registry hives.

NOTE:

  • This post assumes that you have tried other recovery methods and still can’t access the system, except by using Recovery Console. If you haven’t tried other methods of recovery yet, try them first. Click here to know a few other methods of recovery, before you try this method. However if you’ve already tried the other methods, go ahead and try the one mentioned below.
  • Make sure to replace all five registry hives. If you replace only a single hive or two, this can cause problems because software and hardware may have settings in more than one location in the registry.
  • This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows folder if it is in a different location.

Since your Windows already crashed, you’re probably viewing this post on another computer. It’s better if you take a printout of this post, because you’ll have to type many commands to recover your corrupted Windows XP installation. Even if you don’t have to type them, it’s better to have a printout. If you don’t want to print the images, here’s a text-only version of this post.

It’s possible that somehow your Windows registry is corrupt. But there is a backup of the registry! Since Windows doesn’t start, we’ll have to restore this backed up registry files, manually. How do you do that? Follow the procedure detailed below.

1. Boot the computer with your Windows XP CD in the drive. If you see a message like "Press any key to boot from CD …", go ahead and press a key on your keyboard.

Press_any_key_CD_boot

2. If you don’t see any such message or if your computer doesn’t boot from the CD, go into your BIOS/CMOS setup, by rebooting the computer and pressing the appropriate key (like F1, F2, F10, DEL, etc).

image 

3. If you don’t even see the message to press the above keys to enter the BIOS setup, read your motherboard manual on how to enter the BIOS setup. These videos about BIOS and CMOS may be helpful too:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKaKj6uRLSM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLaoajhiN_k

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exU85jk9UyM

4. Now, when booting from the XP CD, when you see the Welcome to Setup screen, press R to start the Recovery Console.

XP_Welcome_to_Setup_Screen

5. You will see the following screen. Type 1 and press the Enter key. You’ll have to enter the Administrator password. If you didn’t set a password, when you installed Windows XP, just press the Enter key.

Recovery_Console_Admin_Login

NOTE: If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step six and seven, and paste it in a text file called "Regcopy1.txt" (for example). You can also download this text file and save it on a USB pen drive, before you run the below command. To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:

batch regcopy1.txt

To know, how to access files on other drives when in the recovery console (USB pen drive, for example), type the following three commands, one per line, and press the Enter key after each command (make sure to type the space on both sides of the equal sign):

AllowWildCards = TRUE
AllowAllPaths = TRUE
AllowRemovableMedia = TRUE

6. Now type the commands you see below, one per line and then press the Enter key, after each command:

md c:\tmp
cd\system32\config
copy system c:\tmp\system.bak
copy software c:\tmp\software.bak
copy sam c:\tmp\sam.bak
copy security c:\tmp\security.bak
copy default c:\tmp\default.bak
del system software sam security default

After you enter each of the above copy commands, the system will reply with a message like "1 file(s) copied".

7. Now, type this set of commands, one per line and press the Enter key after each (Take care to type the space and the dot as shown):

copy c:\windows\repair\system .
copy c:\windows\repair\software .
copy c:\windows\repair\sam .
copy c:\windows\repair\security .
copy c:\windows\repair\default .

8. Now type exit and press the Enter key. The system will reboot.

9. Remove the CD from the drive and boot into Windows normally, as you do before. If, even after doing each of the above steps correctly, Windows doesn’t boot, you’ll have to do a clean install of Windows, after taking a backup of your data. There is no other way to recover.

But, the question is – How do you take a backup of a computer which doesn’t even boot or start Windows? Click here to read more on this topic and backup your computer before you format the hard drive or reinstall Windows from scratch.

However, if the system boots into Windows, then do the following:

a. Start Windows Explorer. On the Tools menu, click Folder Options and then click the View tab.

Windows_Explorer_Folder_Options

b. Under Hidden Files and Folders, select the radio button "Show Hidden Files and Folders", and then clear the "Hide Protected Operating System Files (Recommended)" check box. Also clear the "Use Simple File Sharing (Recommended)" checkbox. This is the last checkbox under the Advanced settings, so you’ll have to scroll down.

c. Click Yes when a dialog box is displayed. Then, click OK to close Folder Options.
Folder_Options

d. Now, check whether you have an NTFS or a FAT32 file system. How do you check if you have NTFS or FAT32 file system? In My Computer or Windows Explorer, right-click the C drive (or your Windows drive, if other than C) and then click Properties.

C_Drive_Properties

e. If the file system on C drive is NTFS, Windows won’t let you open this folder, but there’s a solution. Under the C drive, right-click on the System Volume Information folder and select Properties. In the drive properties, click the Security tab. Click the Add button, and then in the box that’s labeled "Enter the object names to select", type the username that you use to log on to Windows. This is shown in the image below.

If your file system is FAT32, you don’t have to do anything like the above. You can access the System Volume Information folder without any problems.

System_Volume_Information_Add_User

f. Now, open the System Volume Information folder. This folder appears dimmed, that’s fine.

g. This folder contains some _restore {GUID} folders such as "_restore{87BD3667-3246-476B-923F-F86E30B3E7F8}". Open a folder that was created before the current date and time. You may have to click Details on the View menu to check this.

h. There may be one or more folders starting with the name "RP x", under this folder. These are the restore points. Open one of these folders to locate a Snapshot subfolder.

_restore_folders

i. The following path is an example of a folder path to the Snapshot folder:

C:\System Volume Information\_restore{D86480E3-73EF-47BC-A0EBA81BE6EE3ED8}\RP1\Snapshot

j. From the Snapshot folder, copy the following files to the C:\tmp folder with the mouse (by Ctrl-clicking them):

_registry_user_.default
_registry_machine_security
_registry_machine_software
_registry_machine_system
_registry_machine_sam

_restore_snapshot_folder

k. Rename the above five files as given below (using the mouse or the F2 function key):

_registry_user_.default        default
_registry_machine_security     security
_registry_machine_software     software
_registry_machine_system       system
_registry_machine_sam          sam

l. Once again, put your Windows XP installation CD into your CD Drive and reboot the computer.

m. Again, press R for the recovery console when you see the message for recovery, just like you did in step 4 above.

NOTE: If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text commands in step n, and paste it in a text file called "Regcopy2.txt" (for example). You can also download this text file and save it on a USB pen drive, before you run the below command.To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:

batch regcopy2.txt

n. At the console, type these commands one per line and press enter after every command (take care to type the dots exactly as shown in each command):

cd\system32\config
del sam security software default system
copy c:\tmp\software .
copy c:\tmp\system .
copy c:\tmp\sam .
copy c:\tmp\security .
copy c:\tmp\.default .

o. Now, type exit and remove the CD. Boot normally into Windows and you must be back to normal. In case, the restore point is not the one which you wanted, you can use the System Restore to restore a different restore point. This time you are already in Windows so you don’t have to use the recovery console. For more information, how to use the System Restore in Windows XP, click here.

How to use Safe-Mode in Windows XP/Vista?

January 19th, 2011 1 comment

Windows’ Safe Mode is a special Windows mode, where you can perform diagnostics to check what is wrong with the computer, when Windows won’t boot normally. Safe mode loads only the minimal drivers and files needed to start Windows.

To start Windows in safe mode, you press the F8 function key just before you see the "Starting Windows XP" screen. This would be hard for new users, so it’s better to just keep pressing the F8 key once the BIOS screen display goes away.


When you press F8, you see the following Windows boot menu, as shown in the image below. Select one of the three safe modes and press the Enter key to boot Windows with the selected safe mode.

After pressing the Enter key, you’ll see something like the following screen where the drivers are loaded.

After a little time, Windows asks you the Administrator or administrator equivalent user’s password. Type in the password and press the Enter key to log on.

After logging on, you’ll see the safe mode warning message. If you want to start the safe mode, click on YES, or just press the Enter key. If you want to run System Recovery, click NO.

Once you’re in Safe Mode, you can scan your computer for viruses, defragment your hard drive, uninstall recently installed software programs or use System Restore to revert your computer to a more stable environment. Some software programs won’t run while you’re in Safe Mode, so it should only be used to diagnose and repair issues with your operating system. For more information about System Restore, view this post.

Once you’re finished with your troubleshooting and repairs, just restart Windows as you normally would. Your system will boot normally and you can use your programs.

Resolving the "Unknown Device" error in Windows XP / 2003

January 17th, 2011 1 comment

For some reason you had to reinstall Windows. Most of the devices attached to the computer were recognized by Windows and the drivers installed automatically. But, when you check the Device Manager to see whether all the drivers are okay, you find a yellow question mark section labeled ‘Other devices’, which is already expanded. Under that, you see a device for which Windows couldn’t install a proper driver.

Sometimes the device is identified correctly, but Windows doesn’t have the correct driver for it. At other times, the device isn’t identified at all and you’d see an "unknown device" listed. Since Windows doesn’t say what the device is, how do you know, what driver you need to download and install? Everyone won’t take the cover off the computer case and inspect. Even if you can, you may be just lazy to open the computer. Still, you may not know what the device could be. What do you do in such a case?

This "Unknown Device" can be seen as a yellow question mark, if you open the Device Manager. There may be more than one device under the question mark.


Most of the time, the device would have a unique ID burned into it. This ID can be used to find information about the device.

How to find this ID?

Open the Device Manager. Open the properties for the "Unknown Device" and then click the ‘Details‘ tab. Select ‘Hardware IDs‘ from the drop-down list. There may be many lines of junk. You only need the first line. It contains all the information needed to find the correct driver.

Taking the following example, VID stands for vendor ID and the number following it is 03E8. Put this into the PCI Vendor and Device List database’s Search box and then click Search. Once you know the device name and manufacturer, you can search a driver for it, download and install it. Here’s a video about using PCI database.


Unknown Device Identifier is a small freeware program from Huntersoft, which identifies unknown devices, not recognized by Windows. It searches working drivers on the Internet and contacts hardware manufacturers or vendors directly.


Unknown_Device_Identifier


It comes in handy when you reinstall your operating system and cannot figure out what to do with all those devices with yellow question marks in the device manager.

Unknown Device Identifier is a nice program. It’s easy to use and is a great help to people who need to install drivers for undetected devices on their computers.

System Restore FAQ

January 11th, 2011 4 comments

Q.1. What is System Restore?

Q.2. How to open or start System Restore?

Q.3. How to open or start System Restore from the Run command box?

Q.4. What are the other  ways to start System Restore?

Q.5. If I restore to a point before a program was installed, will System Restore remove the program?

Q.6. What is restored and what is not restored when performing a System Restore?

Q.7. If I don’t want System Restore to monitor a particular drive, how to do that?

Q.8. How can I see how much disk space System Restore has used?

Q.9. How can I control the disk space, which System Restore uses?

Q.10. Why isn’t System Restore creating automatic Restore Points?

Q.11. Why doesn’t System Restore work on my computer?

Q.12. Can a virus be stored in a Restore Point?

Q.13. How much disk space is used by System Restore?

OR

What are the disk space requirements for using System Restore?

Q.14. When are the Restore Points created?

Q.15. Can I delete the Restore Points which I don’t need?

Q.16. Why are my Restore Points missing?

Q.17. Does System Restore make my system run slower?

Q.18. How do I perform a System Restore?

Q.19. How to create a restore point with System Restore?

Q.20. Is there a way to run System Restore from the Command Prompt?

OR

How to run System Restore from the command line?

Q.21. Can I use System Restore instead of other backup software programs?

Q.22. How to turn on/enable System Restore?

OR

How to turn off/disable System Restore?

Q.23. Can System Restore be run in safe-mode?

OR

How to run System Restore in safe-mode?

Q.24. How to reinstall System Restore?

Q.25. How can I test System Restore?

Q.26. Can I use System Restore to uninstall or reinstall software programs?

Q.27.  What should I do before running System Restore?

Q.28. What happens to User Accounts in the restore process?

Q.29. What should I do after restoring my system to an earlier date?

Q.30. How to Restore a Windows XP system to a previous state using System Restore?

Q.31. What are the limitations of System Restore?

Q.1. What is System Restore?

System Restore is a Windows program which can roll back system files, registry keys, installed programs and drivers to a previous date. You can create a new restore point, roll back to a previously created restore point and undo the restore which you did previously.

By default, restore points of many weeks are created and as new restore points are created, old restore points are removed. You can change the disk space settings for System Restore. You can also disable System Restore, if needed.

System Restore monitors and backs up system files with specific extensions (.exe, .dll, etc.) and saves them for later recovery and use. It also backs up the registry and most drivers.

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Q.2. How to open or start System Restore?

Click the Start button, point to All Programs -> Accessories -> System Tools and then click System Restore.

SystemRestore1

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Q.3. How to open or start System Restore from the Run command box?

Click Start -> Run, type the following command and then press the Enter key:

restore\rstrui.exe

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Q.4. What are the other  ways to start System Restore?

a. Click Start -> Run. Type msconfig and press the Enter key.  When msconfig starts, click the button labeled “Launch System Restore”.

SystemRestore2

b. Click Start and then click Help and Support.  In Help and Support, click "Undo changes to your computer with System Restore".

SystemRestore3

c. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del or Ctrl+Shift+Esc to launch the Task Manager. Click File -> New Task –> Create New Task. Type the following command then click OK:
restore\rstrui.exe

SystemRestore4

d. Type the following command at a command prompt, and then press the ENTER key:

restore\rstrui.exe

SystemRestore5

Follow the instructions to restore your computer to an earlier state, or undo the last restore if available. Note: When restoring a system from the command prompt, an automatic “UNDO” restore point will NOT be created and System Restore won’t  allow a restoration to the current state.

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Q.5. If I restore to a point before a program was installed, will System Restore remove the program?

No, System Restore does not change or monitor program installations. An exception is when the program only contains an executable or only the file types which System Restore monitors.

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Q.6. What is restored and what is not restored when performing a System Restore?

According to Microsoft, the following are restored:

  • Registry (note: some current values will persist)
  • Profiles (local only—roaming user profiles not impacted by restore)
  • COM+ DB
  • WFP.dll cache
  • WMI DB
  • IIS Metabase
  • Files with extensions listed in the Monitored File Extensions list

According to Microsoft, the following are not restored:

  • DRM settings
  • SAM hives (does not restore passwords)
  • WPA settings (Windows authentication information is not restored)
  • Contents of the My Documents folder(s)
  • Specific directories/files listed in the Monitored File Extensions list
  • Any file with an extension not listed in the Monitored File Extensions list
  • Items listed in both Filesnottobackup and KeysnottoRestore (hklm->system->controlset001->control->backuprestore->filesnottobackup and keysnottorestore)
  • User-created data stored in the user profile
  • Contents of redirected folders

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    Q.7. If I don’t want System Restore to monitor a particular drive, how to do that?


You can’t stop System Restore on the Windows drive, but you can stop it from monitoring other drives or partitions. Open the System Properties by right clicking My Computer and clicking Properties, or by running the command sysdm.cpl from the Start -> Run command box. Then, click the System Restore tab.

On computers which have only a single partition, it’s only possible to turn off System Restore by placing a check-mark in the box labeled “Turn off System Restore on all drives”. If your computer hard drive has more than one partition, you can turn off System Restore on the other drives by selecting that particular drive and then clicking the Settings button, as shown in the image below.

Place a check-mark in the box titled “Turn off system restore on this drive”.  Then, click OK, and then OK again.

SystemRestore6

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Q.8. How can I see how much disk space System Restore has used?

a. Start Windows Explorer. On the Tools menu, click Folder Options and then click the View tab.

SystemRestore7

b. Under Hidden Files and Folders, select the radio button “Show Hidden Files and Folders”, and then clear the “Hide Protected Operating System Files (Recommended)” check box. Also clear the “Use Simple File Sharing (Recommended)” check-box. This is the last checkbox under the Advanced settings, so you’ll have to scroll down.

c. Click Yes when a dialog box is displayed. Then, click OK to close Folder Options.

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d. Now, check whether you have an NTFS or a FAT32 file system. How do you check if you have NTFS or FAT32 file system? In My Computer or Windows Explorer, right-click the C drive (or your Windows drive, if other than C) and then click Properties.

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e. If the file system on C drive is NTFS, Windows won’t let you open this folder, but there’s a solution. Under the C drive, right-click on the System Volume Information folder and select Properties. In the drive properties, click the Security tab.

Click the Add button, and then in the box that’s labeled "Enter the object names to select", type the username  that you use to log on to Windows. This is shown in the image below. If your file system is FAT32, you don’t have to do anything like the above. You can access the System Volume Information folder without any problems.

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f. Right-click the System Volume Information folder and click Properties. You will notice a "Size on disk" value in the properties. This is the amount of space that System Restore is currently using for your restore points. See the image below.

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Note: Repeat the above procedure for any other drives or partitions, which you would like to check.

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Q.9. How can I control the disk space, which System Restore uses?

Windows is set to use the maximum amount of available disk space for System Restore, by default. If you want System Restore to use less disk space, then do the following: Click Start and then click Run. In the Run command box, type sysdm.cpl and press the Enter key.

On the System Properties, click the “System Restore” tab. If you have a single partition, click the Settings button and reduce the disk space by sliding the bar to the left. If you have multiple partitions, select each partition and then click the Settings button.

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Q.10. Why isn’t System Restore creating automatic Restore Points?

This may happen due to one of the following two reasons: The “Task Scheduler” service  must be running on your computer for System Restore to create automatic restore points. If this service is disabled, System Restore can’t create automatic restore points. To check if this service is running, click Start, then click Run.

In the Run command box, type services.msc and then press the Enter key. Scroll the list of services until you find the “Task Scheduler” service. Make sure that it is set to Automatic and the status says “Started”. In case, it’s set to manual or disabled, double-click it and select Automatic. Then right-click it and click start.

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If your computer constantly runs programs, this can be another reason for System Restore not able to create automatic restore points.  System Restore needs the computer to be idle, before it can take a snapshot of your computer. Disable some running programs or the programs which run in the background. Then, check again whether automatic restore points are created.

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Q.11. Why doesn’t System Restore work on my computer?

Here are some basic troubleshooting steps to find why System Restore is not working.

a. Make sure that the System Restore service is running on your computer:

Click Start and then click Run. In the Run command box, type services.msc and then press the Enter key. Scroll down till you see the System Restore service in the list of services.  The status of the service should be “Started” and the startup type should be “Automatic”. If these settings are otherwise, double-click System Restore and change the Startup type to “Automatic” and then start the service by right-clicking it.

b. Also, make sure that the Task Scheduler service is running. In the list of services, above, find the Task Scheduler service and if it’s not set to “Automatic”, set it to automatic and start the service if it is not already started.

c. Make sure that you have enough free disk space available. When your disk space goes below 200 MB, System Restore will not create restore points any more. You should free up disk space for System Restore to work again.

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Q.12. Can a virus be stored in a Restore Point?

Many viruses have the same extension as the Windows executables and other files which the System Restore monitors. So, if your computer is infected with a virus, System Restore may take a snapshot of the system at that time and keep the virus in the snapshot too. Now, if you remove the virus from the computer, but later restore the system to a previous date, using System Restore, the virus will be restored too.

The best thing to do when you suspect or find a virus, is to disable System Restore first and then scan your system in safe mode or using a boot-time scan, if your Antivirus program has that option. But, remember that once System Restore is disabled, all the restore points would be deleted. After the virus is removed, you should then enable System Restore once again, and then create a new restore point.

For more information, see:

How to turn off System Restore

How to create a restore point manually.

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Q.13. How much disk space is used by System Restore? OR

What are the disk space requirements for using System Restore?

The amount of space used by System Restore depends on the amount of free space available on your hard drive. If your hard drive has more than 4 GB free space, System Restore can use about 12 percent of that space at the maximum. If you have less than 4 GB of free space available, only 400 MB space is used for System Restore.  You can control or change the amount of space that System Restore uses, but the maximum it can use is 12 percent of the free space.

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Q.14. When are the Restore Points created?

You can create restore points, manually, whenever you wish. Windows creates them automatically when:

  • Installing an unsigned device driver.
  • Installing programs which use the Windows Installer or Install Shield  Pro version 7 or later.
  • You try to restore the system to a previous date.
  • Windows applies updates automatically.
  • You restore data using the Windows Backup.
  • The computer is operated for 24 hours, since the creation of the last restore point.

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Q.15. Can I delete the Restore Points which I don’t need?

You cannot select the restore points manually, but you have two options to delete the restore points. You can delete all the restore points except the last (or latest) one, or you can delete all the restore points. To delete all the restore points except the last one:

Click Start, then click Run. Type the following command and then press the Enter key: cleanmgr Click the “More Options” tab and then click the Cleanup button in the System Restore box.

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To delete all the restore points, simply turn off System Restore, click apply and then again turn on System Restore by enabling it.

For more information, see How to turn off System Restore.

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Q.16. Why are my Restore Points missing?

The most common reason for missing restore points is the lack of free disk space on your hard drive.

When there is less free disk space, System Restore deletes the restore points starting from the oldest one, to get more disk space. Windows also warns you about low disk space. To free up disk space, see this page.

To know more about this problem, visit the following link at Microsoft.

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Q.17. Does System Restore make my system run slower?

You won’t notice any performance loss by having System Restore enabled on your computer. Creating restore points only takes a few seconds and this happens only after 24 hours of system operation, and that too when the computer is idle.

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Q.18. How do I perform a System Restore?

Open System restore and click the Next button. Then, click a bold date on the calendar, and on the right of the calendar, select the restore point to which you want to restore your computer to (if there are more than one).

System Restore restores the previous Windows XP configuration, and then restarts the computer. After Windows restarts, System Restore will tell you whether the restore was successful or not. If it was successful, you’re done . If not successful, it will give an error. Or if you aren’t happy with the restore, you can undo the restore by starting System Restore once again and selecting “Undo the last restoration.”

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Q.19. How to create a restore point with System Restore?

Open System Restore and click the radio button labeled “Create a restore point”. Then, click Next.

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System Restore will ask you to type a description for this restore point. Type a meaningful description in the text box and click Create.

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Q.20. Is there a way to run System Restore from the Command Prompt? OR

How to run System Restore from the command line?

Type the following command at a command prompt, and then press the ENTER key:

restore\rstrui.exe

This command can also be run from the safe mode command prompt, if Windows doesn’t start in any mode (normal and safe mode).

Note: When restoring a system from the safe mode command prompt, an automatic “UNDO” restore point will NOT be created and you can’t restore the computer to the current state.

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Q.21. Can I use System Restore instead of other backup software programs?

No. System Restore is not a replacement for backup programs. It’s not meant to backup data files. It only monitors specific system and program files. It backs up these files regularly, but the restore points are available for a maximum of 90 days. If you are low on disk space, System Restore deletes the old snapshots and replaces them with new ones, even before 90 days.

You should use a real backup program or the built-in Windows Backup, to backup your data.  Such backup programs are meant for permanent backup, unlike the System Restore, and you have full control of what to backup and where to backup, what to restore and where to restore.

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Q.22. How to turn on/enable System Restore? OR

How to turn off/disable System Restore?

Open the System Properties by right clicking My Computer and clicking Properties, or by running the command sysdm.cpl from the Start -> Run command box. In System Properties, click the System Restore tab.

On computers which have only a single partition, it’s only possible to turn off System Restore by placing a checkmark in the box labeled, “Turn off System Restore on all drives”. If your computer hard drive has more than one partition, you can turn off System Restore on the individual drives or partitions by selecting that particular drive and then clicking the Settings button, as shown in the image below.

Place a checkmark on the“Turn off System Restore on this drive” checkbox.  Then, click OK (twice).

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To enable System Restore, open the same System Properties as you did above, and if there’s a check mark in the box which says “Turn off System Restore on all drives”, remove the checkmark and then click OK. If the above box isn’t checked, you can check the settings for each drive and turn on System Restore for the drive you want, by removing the checkmark on the “Turn off System Restore on this drive” checkbox, as shown in the above image.

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Q.23. Can System Restore be run in safe-mode? OR

How to run System Restore in safe-mode?

When you log on to Windows in safe mode, Windows asks you if you want to run Windows in safe mode, or if you want to start the System Restore. If you click yes, safe mode starts, if you click no, System Restore starts.

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For best results, you should always try to run System Restore from safe mode. Note that after you run the System Restore from safe mode and reboot the system, you don’t get the message that the System Restore was successful, until you restart Windows again in safe mode. In normal mode, you don’t get this message, even though System Restore was successful. So, you may want to go to safe mode, once again to confirm whether System Restore was successful.

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Q.24. How to reinstall System Restore?

Warning: Reinstalling System Restore will delete all existing restore points.

Click Start and then click the Run command box. Type in the following command and then press the Enter key:

rundll32.exe advpack.dll,LaunchINFSection C:\Windows\Inf\sr.inf

If the Files Needed dialog box appears, click Browse and point to one of these locations:

The i386 folder on the Windows XP CD.

The i386 folder on the hard drive, if one exists.

The i386 folder on the Windows XP SP2/SP3 CD, if you have it.

When the reinstall is complete, Windows gives the following message:

You must restart your computer before the new settings will take effect.

Do you want to restart your computer now?

At this point click YES.

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Q.25. How can I test System Restore?

Start  System Restore, create a new restore point and name it TEST. Then, create a new shortcut on the desktop and point it to the Desktop or any other file of your choice and name it TEST, as shown in the images below.

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Now open System Restore and restore your computer to the restore point named TEST.

The computer will reboot and will give a status message, whether the restore was successful or not. If it was successful, the TEST shortcut on the desktop won’t be there now.

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Q.26. Can I use System Restore to uninstall or reinstall software programs?

No, System Restore cannot completely uninstall programs, when restoring to a point before the program was installed. System Restore doesn’t monitor all the files that a program uses, so when you restore the computer to a point before the program was installed, only the files which are monitored are removed/restored. The registry entries are also removed/restored. This can make the program not to work. In some cases, this will leave the program in an unstable state where you can’t uninstall it completely, nor install it properly again. So, it’s recommended that you uninstall and later reinstall any programs which were installed after the creation of the restore point, which you want to restore to.

If uninstalling or reinstalling a program fails, undo the restore, then uninstall the program and do the restore once again. If the uninstall or reinstall still fails, download and install a free registry cleaner and clean the registry. It will remove the improperly installed program from the registry. Then,  you can continue with the installation.

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Q.27.  What should I do before running System Restore?

System Restore should only be used after you’ve troubleshot the computer using other methods. You should first try by rebooting the computer. This simple method may solve your problem. If it does not, then you should try to boot the computer into the “Last Known Good Configuration” option from the boot menu by pressing the F8 key, when the computer restarts.

You should also uninstall any programs that were installed after the restore point was created.

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Q.28. What happens to User Accounts in the restore process?

If you restore the computer to a time before you created the user accounts, the restoration will remove those user accounts. However, the user account names and folders will still remain under C:\Documents and Settings.  Any files and folders in the My Documents folder won’t be restored because My Documents folder is not monitored by System Restore.

If you restore the computer to a point before a user account was deleted, System Restore will restore the user account. However, the user’s files and folders that were in the “My Documents” folder won’t be restored, because that folder is not monitored by System Restore.

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Q.29. What should I do after restoring my system to an earlier date?

When you restore the computer to an earlier date, the files which are monitored by System Restore, will be reverted back to the versions on that date. You should apply software updates to Windows and any other software programs, which you have installed.

Any software program which you installed after the creation of the restore point may not work because System Restore only removes or restores the monitored files. The other files needed by the program remain as they were. This can make those programs unstable, and you may not be able to re-install or even uninstall those programs. You should uninstall any such programs which were installed after the creation of the restore point. Do this before you restore the computer to an earlier date.

If you didn’t uninstall a program and do a restore, System Restore may not completely remove the program. To remove it, you may have to reinstall it and then uninstall it from the Add/Remove Programs. If you aren’t able to remove any such program, use a free registry cleaner to remove the entries for this program from the registry. You can also use Microsoft TweakUI to remove the entries from the Add/Remove Programs’ list.

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Q.30. How to Restore a Windows XP system to a previous state using System Restore?

If you can start Windows XP in any mode (normal mode, safe mode, safe mode with networking or safe mode with command prompt), you can restore your system to a previous state by using System Restore.

If Windows can start in normal mode, log on as Administrator or a user with administrator rights. Then, click Start, point to All Programs -> Accessories -> System Tools and click System Restore.

If Windows can boot in any of the safe modes, log on as Administrator or a user with administrator rights. When you get the welcome screen, asking you if you want to start the safe mode, click NO. Clicking NO will start System Restore.

You can also type or paste the following command in the StartRun command box and press the Enter key:

%systemroot%\system32\restore\rstrui.exe

or just restore\rstrui.exe

This command can also be used at the Safe Mode Command Prompt.

Once System Restore starts in any of the above Windows mode, restore the system to an earlier time by clicking Next and selecting a bold date on the calendar.

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Q.31. What are the limitations of System Restore?

System Restore doesn’t track every change made to the operating system. It monitors only a few file types in specific locations on the volume. Due to this, some software upgrades may not be completely  reversed by System Restore. Also, there may be problems when you try to run or remove such applications.

System Restore needs some amount of free space on the volume. If there’s little space left on the drive, System Restore will fail to create a restore point. In such a case, when you try to do a System Restore, you see that there is no restore point available to do a restore.

A restore point is not permanent. After a few days, it will be deleted and new restore points will be created. So, if you don’t notice a problem within a few days’ time, it may be too late when you try to do a System Restore, later.

If your system or programs are infected with virus or any kind of malware, System Restore can’t know this and these malicious programs are also backed up when restore points are created.

Since System Restore doesn’t allow users or programs to access the folder where restore points are stored, and its method of backing up is very simple, it may backup virus infected program files. Your antivirus program won’t be able to remove the malware from the System Restore points. There’s only one way to remove an infected restore point – by turning System Restore off. This will delete all the restore points.

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