Archive

Archive for December, 2009

Vga.dll File Not Found Error

December 9th, 2009 No comments

Vga.dll errors are caused by when the vga.dll file is either removed or corrupted. It could indicate a registry problem, a virus or malware, or sometimes a hardware failure.

How to solve Vga.dll errors:

*If you can’t start Windows normally, use the Safe Mode.

  • Check your Recycle Bin to see if vga.dll is there. If you see it there, you probably accidentally deleted it. You can restore it from here. (If you emptied your Recycle Bin you and you know you deleted the file, you can try running a file recovery program to restore it.)
  • Run a virus scan on your computer to see if you are affected by a virus or malware. vga.dll file errors can be caused by a virus. The file might still be on your machine, but is masked.
  • If running a certain program causes the error message, try to reinstall that program.
  • If you get the error message when you are using a hardware device, try updating the drivers.
  • If the error message started showing up after updating drivers, you might try rolling them back.
  • Run the System File Checker.
  • Install any available Windows Updates. Many service packs and patches actually replace or update your .dll files.
  • Test your memory and your hard drive. You might need to replace one or the other.
  • Use a free registry cleaner to repair your .dll files
  • As a last resort, if none of the above tips work, you might consider doing a clean installation of Windows. Keep in mind that your hard drive will be wiped clean. Make sure you have everything backed up and know how to reinstall everything you need. If you see the error message after doing this, you can be certain that the problem is hardware related.

Relay Timer Lite Driver Update

December 8th, 2009 No comments

Relay Timer Lite is a useful application for NCD ProXR relay controller boards. It is compatible with one board that has eight relays. Every relay can be set separately with several timers. The relay can be turned on/off manually with its user interface. It can detect all existing COM ports automatically. It is a specialized program that gains control of peripheral devices, and the conditions of all relays can be displayed and operated at the same time.

Relay Timer 2.1 (December 08, 2009) is developed using the latest technology from Windows. It supports Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows 2003, Windows NT, Windows XP, Windows Vista as well as 64-bit Windows operating system. It can control the relays with its accurate timer, while it uses the processor’s resource at very low rate. It is strong, synchronized and convenient. You can download the trial version on this link or you can purchase its full version here for only $169.00.

 

Categories: Hardware, Motherboards Tags:

How to Enable a Device in Windows 7

December 6th, 2009 4 comments

Even though you might see your device displayed in the Device Manager in Windows 7, you must enable it before you can use it. When your device is disabled, Windows won’t assign system resources to it. The devices that are disabled will have a black arrow next to them and will generate a Code 22 error.

Here’s how to enable a device once you are in the Device Manager:

  • Right click on the hardware device you want to enable
  • Select Properties
  • Click on the Driver tab
  • Click Enable, then click OK
  • Once you return to the Device Manager, the black arrow should be gone. If you see a yellow exclamation point, the device still isn’t working properly. Click here to see how to troubleshoot the yellow exclamation point.
  • If you want to verify that your device is working properly, you can check the device status in the Device Manager.

How to Enable a Device in Windows XP

December 4th, 2009 No comments

Even though you might see your device displayed in the Device Manager in Windows XP, you must enable it before you can use it. When your device is disabled, Windows won’t assign system resources to it. The devices that are disabled will have a red x next to them and will generate a Code 22 error.

Here’s how to enable a device once you are in the Device Manager:

  • Right click on the hardware device you want to enable
  • Select Properties
  • Click on the Device Usage drop down box – right now it should say “Do not use this device”
  • Select “Use this device” and click OK
  • Once you return to the Device Manager, the red x should be gone. If you see a yellow exclamation point, the device still isn’t working properly. Click here to see how to troubleshoot the yellow exclamation point.
  • If you want to verify that your device is working properly, you can check the device status in the Device Manager.
Categories: XP Drivers Tags: ,

How to Update Drivers in Windows XP

December 3rd, 2009 1 comment

If Windows XP doesn’t install a device automatically, or if the hardware is having some kind of problem, you’ll need to know how to update/install drivers in Windows XP.

If you see a Device Manager Error, sometimes the solution is as easy as updating the driver. Updating the drivers for a piece of hardware will sometimes enable additional features for the hardware as well.

Here’s how to update drivers in Windows XP:

  1. Check the device manufacturer’s web site for the most current drivers available for your hardware. Note: Many drivers come packaged with software that automatically installs the driver. The manufacturer’s website will tell you if the driver download is packaged this way and if so, the steps below aren’t usually necessary.
  2. Open Device Manager
  3. Locate the hardware device you wish to update drivers for.Click on the [+] icon to expand the categories.
  4. After finding the hardware you’re updating drivers for, right click on the hardware’s name or icon and choose Properties. In this Properties window, click the Driver tab.
  5. Click the Update Driver… button. The Hardware Update Wizard will begin.

  6. Click the No, not this time button and then click the Next > button. When asked “Can Windows connect to Windows Update to search for software?”
  7. Choose the Install from a list or specific location (Advanced) button and then click the Next > button. When asked What do you want the wizard to do?” The next window that appears will be the Please choose your search and installation options. window containing several buttons and checkboxes.
  8. Choose the Don’t search. I will choose the driver to install button and then click the Next > button.
  9. Click the Have Disk… button on the Select the device driver you want to install for this hardware. window.
  10. Click the Browse… button on the Install From Disk dialog box that appeared.
  11. Click the INF file that displays in the file list and click the Open button.
  12. Click the OK button back on the Install From Disk dialog box.
  13. Choose the newly added hardware back on the Select the device driver you want to install for this hardware. window and then click the Next > button.

    If you’re prompted with a message warning you about the software for the hardware device not passing the Windows Logo testing, click the Continue Anyway button. Many drivers are not Windows certified but are still perfectly safe to install. (If you’re installing a driver obtained from anywhere other than the manufacturer of the hardware, click the STOP Installation button instead and obtain drivers from the manufacturer directly.)

  14. The Hardware Update Wizard will now use the instructions provided in the INF file from Step 11 to install the updated drivers for your hardware. Follow any additional instructions on screen to complete the driver update.
  15. After the driver update is complete, click Yes to the “Do you want to restart your computer now?” question on System Settings Change and other important areas of your computer. Restarting your machine is a good way to confirm that updating drivers hasn’t negatively impacted some other area of Windows. dialog box. Not all driver updates require a restart of your computer. Even if you’re not prompted, I always recommend restarting anyway. The driver update process involves changes to the Windows Registry (If a driver update causes an issue, you can always roll back the driver)
Categories: Driver FAQ, XP Drivers Tags: ,

STOP Error 0x000000B4 – The video driver failed to initialize

December 3rd, 2009 No comments

STOP error 0xB4 means that Windows was unable to enter graphics mode. Your video driver failed to initialize. This happens because of a conflict with the computer’s parallel port and your video card, if the parallel port I/O address is set to 03BC.

To fix this problem you need to change the parallel port I/O address from 03BC to 0378

  1. Restart your machine, and press F8 at the Starting Windows screen.
  2. Select Safe Mode, and then press ENTER
  3. Log on to your using the local administrator account.
  4. Click Start, Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  5. Double-click System.
  6. Click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager.
  7. Click the plus “+” next to ports to expand the ports list.
  8. Select the printer port LPT1, and on the Action menu, click Properties.
  9. Click the Resources tab, and then clear the Use Automatic Settings check box .
  10. In the Settings Based On drop down menu, select a setting that uses an I/O address of 0378 instead of 03BC.
  11. Click OK, and then close Device Manager.

Delete the UpperFilters and LowerFilters Registry Values

December 3rd, 2009 No comments

You can solve several Device Manager error codes by deleting the UpperFilters and LowerFilters registry values from the Windows Registry. Some of the common Device Manager error codes that are caused by UpperFilters and LowerFilters include Code 19, Code 31, Code 39 and Code 41.

It is fairly simple to remove the UpperFilters and LowerFilters registry values. Before you get started, make sure you have backed up the registry keys that you are modifying.

  • Click Start, Run.
  • In the textbox, type regedit (This opens the Registry Editor program.)
  • Click OK.
  • Find the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE folder and click the (+) icon to expand the folder.
  • Keep expanding the folders until you reach the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class registry key.
  • Click the (+) icon next to the CLASS list to expand it. You’ll see a list of 32 digit subkeys. Each one is unique and corresponds to a different class of hardware.
  • Now you need to figure out which device glass GUID (Globally Unique Identifier) you need.
  • Click on the correct subkey
  • Right click on UpperFilters and choose Delete. Confirm that you would like to delete it.
  • Now, right click on LowerFilters and choose Delete. Confirm that you would like to delete it.
  • If you see files named UpperFilters.bak or LowerFilters.bak, you don’t need to delete them.
  • Close the Registry Editor and restart your computer.

How to Enable a Device in Windows Vista

December 3rd, 2009 No comments

Even though you might see your device displayed in the Device Manager in Windows XP, you must enable it before you can use it. When your device is disabled, Windows won’t assign system resources to it. The devices that are disabled will have a red x next to them and will generate a Code 22 error.

Here’s how to enable a device once you are in the Device Manager:

  • Right click on the hardware device you want to enable
  • Select Properties
  • Click on the Driver tab
  • Click Enable, then click OK
  • Once you return to the Device Manager, the black arrow should be gone. If you see a yellow exclamation point, the device still isn’t working properly. Click here to see how to troubleshoot the yellow exclamation point.
  • If you want to verify that your device is working properly, you can check the device status in the Device Manager.
Categories: XP Drivers Tags: